Dr. Cecily Jensen-Clayton

In a new and emerging world, women’s time has come, where the reach and influence of women’s leadership can become publicly recognised and so valued. As a form of leadership that draws on women’s intelligence, women’s entrepreneurial leadership enacts leadership in ways that are contextually sensitive and socially embedded.

Drawing on my expertise as business person, theologian, philosopher, educator, linguist, psychoanalyst, philosopher, musician and poet, I have developed Female Entrepreneurial Intelligence as a theory, philosophy, and practice, this form of intelligence manifest in women’s entrepreneurial leadership.

My present focus includes mentoring and offering spiritual guidance to other awakening women, facilitating development in women’s entrepreneurial leadership, as well as building thriving communities.

My Story

Journeying to find purpose and meaning in my life has given me many challenging and rich experiences. Looking back, I can see many of these experiences came from an entrepreneurial spirit, in being born female, and in seeking out opportunities to explore and build my own potential and the potential of others. Initially, this way of life gained its spark in being a single parent of four children, then during those years through starting up and conducting a small business, continuing in this business for 25 years, while contributing to the community wherever and whenever I saw a need.

The struggle of conducting a business in a male centred society and my community contributions within a male driven societal system, was rewarded in being recognised as an influential community leader by the Commonwealth of Australia in 2003. This achievement further challenged me to gain more skills, to extend my understanding, capacities and capabilities through 20 years of sustained academic study in multiple discipline areas. If I wanted to contribute more and more effectively, to continue to pursue more deeply the meaning and purpose of life, then I needed to know more about life, the use of power, and its relationship to human potential.

Reflecting on my life, I can see having an entrepreneurial approach to life meant all these challenges and experiences contributed to my ongoing awakening, to realise how in being born a girl and becoming a woman had much to do with the personal being political. Being female provided the challenges and experiences that led me to where I am today, in what I am doing now, particularly in developing a theory of female entrepreneurial intelligence. Twenty years of academic study allowed me to articulate an entrepreneurial form of thinking that underpins female entrepreneurial leadership. This type of thinking as a theory, philosophy, and practice, awakened me to my greater potential and led me to recognise my ongoing challenges and experiences as my life’ work. This work now includes mentoring other women in their journey of awakening as they recognise their genius through greater valuing of what they do, how they do it, as well as the potential of this for social and economic flourishing.

What women do and have always done, although historically having been trivialised and its value dismissed, is now the needed thinking and the practices for successfully negotiating our rapidly changing and reordered world, a world where social impact is now front and centre for most business considerations. As women we can be confident and know – our time has come.

Dr. Cecily Jensen-Clayton

In a new and emerging world, women’s time has come, where the reach and influence of women’s leadership can become publicly recognised and so valued. As a form of leadership that draws on women’s intelligence, women’s entrepreneurial leadership enacts leadership in ways that are contextually sensitive and socially embedded.

Drawing on my expertise as business person, theologian, philosopher, educator, linguist, psychoanalyst, philosopher, musician and poet, I have developed Female Entrepreneurial Intelligence as a theory, philosophy, and practice, this form of intelligence manifest in women’s entrepreneurial leadership.

My present focus includes mentoring and offering spiritual guidance to other awakening women, facilitating development in women’s entrepreneurial leadership, as well as building thriving communities.

My Story

Journeying to find purpose and meaning in my life has given me many challenging and rich experiences. Looking back, I can see many of these experiences came from an entrepreneurial spirit, in being born female, and in seeking out opportunities to explore and build my own potential and the potential of others. Initially, this way of life gained its spark in being a single parent of four children, then during those years through starting up and conducting a small business, continuing in this business for 25 years, while contributing to the community wherever and whenever I saw a need.

The struggle of conducting a business in a male centred society and my community contributions within a male driven societal system, was rewarded in being recognised as an influential community leader by the Commonwealth of Australia in 2003. This achievement further challenged me to gain more skills, to extend my understanding, capacities and capabilities through 20 years of sustained academic study in multiple discipline areas. If I wanted to contribute more and more effectively, to continue to pursue more deeply the meaning and purpose of life, then I needed to know more about life, the use of power, and its relationship to human potential.

Reflecting on my life, I can see having an entrepreneurial approach to life meant all these challenges and experiences contributed to my ongoing awakening, to realise how in being born a girl and becoming a woman had much to do with the personal being political. Being female provided the challenges and experiences that led me to where I am today, in what I am doing now, particularly in developing a theory of female entrepreneurial intelligence. Twenty years of academic study allowed me to articulate an entrepreneurial form of thinking that underpins female entrepreneurial leadership. This type of thinking as a theory, philosophy, and practice, awakened me to my greater potential and led me to recognise my ongoing challenges and experiences as my life’ work. This work now includes mentoring other women in their journey of awakening as they recognise their genius through greater valuing of what they do, how they do it, as well as the potential of this for social and economic flourishing.

What women do and have always done, although historically having been trivialised and its value dismissed, is now the needed thinking and the practices for successfully negotiating our rapidly changing and reordered world, a world where social impact is now front and centre for most business considerations. As women we can be confident and know – our time has come.

Female

Entrepreneurial Intelligence

Female entrepreneurial intelligence is a way of perceiving the world that pays close attention to sensory information, information that we receive through our bodies. Female entrepreneurial intelligence is not exclusive to women; however, as girls and women are socialised to pay more attention to their bodies this form of intelligence comes more naturally to women. Female entrepreneurial intelligence as a sensory/bodily based approach to a situation is a set of intelligences (bodily, nomadic, cognitive) working in a concerted dynamic that captures the ‘livingness’ in a situation, bringing benefits to multiple stakeholders. The inclusivity in this approach can be seen in the ways in which women generally network to make things happen in their local communities or organisations. As such Female entrepreneurial intelligence is an approach, an empowered way of thinking that is contextual, fit-for-purpose, and human values based.

Some of the significance of this form of intelligence lies in its extension of the accepted/assumed meaning of ‘entrepreneurial activity’, enabling it to include anything that enhances community life and brings about conditions for communities to flourish. This form of intelligence is not directly tied to money, profit, and economics. The genius of female entrepreneurial intelligence is that in its application of creating conditions for the community to flourish is also the means to achieve financial flourishing. This form of intelligence as a theory of inclusion is useful from the micro level of activities in communities to its governance and business interests.

This form of intelligence differs from the generic understanding of entrepreneurial intelligence, the generic form being a masculinised form typically associated with business, business-related activities, and linked to financial outcomes so that the potential of entrepreneurial activity is locked away within this narrow framework. In its internalisation and application, female entrepreneurial intelligence is manifest in women’s entrepreneurial leadership and when viewed through the lens of female entrepreneurial intelligence, prevents the reduction, trivialisation or even dismissal of women’s aspirations and values. In short, female entrepreneurial intelligence takes a considered approach to multiple stakeholders to build social conditions whereby entrepreneurial activity is working for the social and economic flourishing of communities.

Publications

Jensen-Clayton, C. M. (2018). Women Writing to Ourselves: Rescuing the Girl Child from Androcentricity. In A. L. Black & S. Garvis (Eds.), Women Activating Agency in Academia: Metaphors, Manifestos and Memoir. Abingdon, Oxon. UK.: Routledge.

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Macleod, R. (2017). Female pleasure in the academy through erotic power. In S. Riddle, M. Harmes, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Producing pleasure within the contemporary university. Rotterdam, NLD: Sense Publishers

Jensen-Clayton, Cecily (2016) Disrupting dangerous illusions in international education: performativity, subjectivity, and agency in English language courses for overseas students (ELICOS). [Thesis (PhD/Research)]

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Murray, A. J. (2016). Working Beyond the Research Maze. In D. Rossi, F. Gacenga, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Navigating the education research maze: Contextual, conceptual, methodological and transformational challenges and opportunities for researchers. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Murray, A. J. (2016). Working in the research maze: At what price? In D. Rossi, F. Gacenga, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Navigating the education research maze: Contextual, conceptual, methodological and transformational challenges and opportunities for researchers. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Murray, A. J., & Jensen-Clayton, C. M. (2019). Tiptoeing around the institution? Doctoral supervision in the knowledge economy. Submitted to T. Machin, M. Clarà, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Traversing the doctorate: Reflections and strategies from students, supervisors and administrators.

Female

Entrepreneurial Intelligence

Female entrepreneurial intelligence is a way of perceiving the world that pays close attention to sensory information, information that we receive through our bodies. Female entrepreneurial intelligence is not exclusive to women; however, as girls and women are socialised to pay more attention to their bodies this form of intelligence comes more naturally to women. Female entrepreneurial intelligence as a sensory/bodily based approach to a situation is a set of intelligences (bodily, nomadic, cognitive) working in a concerted dynamic that captures the ‘livingness’ in a situation, bringing benefits to multiple stakeholders. The inclusivity in this approach can be seen in the ways in which women generally network to make things happen in their local communities or organisations. As such Female entrepreneurial intelligence is an approach, an empowered way of thinking that is contextual, fit-for-purpose, and human values based.

Some of the significance of this form of intelligence lies in its extension of the accepted/assumed meaning of ‘entrepreneurial activity’, enabling it to include anything that enhances community life and brings about conditions for communities to flourish. This form of intelligence is not directly tied to money, profit, and economics. The genius of female entrepreneurial intelligence is that in its application of creating conditions for the community to flourish is also the means to achieve financial flourishing. This form of intelligence as a theory of inclusion is useful from the micro level of activities in communities to its governance and business interests.

This form of intelligence differs from the generic understanding of entrepreneurial intelligence, the generic form being a masculinised form typically associated with business, business-related activities, and linked to financial outcomes so that the potential of entrepreneurial activity is locked away within this narrow framework. In its internalisation and application, female entrepreneurial intelligence is manifest in women’s entrepreneurial leadership and when viewed through the lens of female entrepreneurial intelligence, prevents the reduction, trivialisation or even dismissal of women’s aspirations and values. In short, female entrepreneurial intelligence takes a considered approach to multiple stakeholders to build social conditions whereby entrepreneurial activity is working for the social and economic flourishing of communities.

Publications

Jensen-Clayton, C. M. (2018). Women Writing to Ourselves: Rescuing the Girl Child from Androcentricity. In A. L. Black & S. Garvis (Eds.), Women Activating Agency in Academia: Metaphors, Manifestos and Memoir. Abingdon, Oxon. UK.: Routledge.

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Macleod, R. (2017). Female pleasure in the academy through erotic power. In S. Riddle, M. Harmes, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Producing pleasure within the contemporary university. Rotterdam, NLD: Sense Publishers

Jensen-Clayton, Cecily (2016) Disrupting dangerous illusions in international education: performativity, subjectivity, and agency in English language courses for overseas students (ELICOS). [Thesis (PhD/Research)]

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Murray, A. J. (2016). Working Beyond the Research Maze. In D. Rossi, F. Gacenga, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Navigating the education research maze: Contextual, conceptual, methodological and transformational challenges and opportunities for researchers. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Jensen-Clayton, C. M., & Murray, A. J. (2016). Working in the research maze: At what price? In D. Rossi, F. Gacenga, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Navigating the education research maze: Contextual, conceptual, methodological and transformational challenges and opportunities for researchers. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Murray, A. J., & Jensen-Clayton, C. M. (2019). Tiptoeing around the institution? Doctoral supervision in the knowledge economy. Submitted to T. Machin, M. Clarà, & P. A. Danaher (Eds.), Traversing the doctorate: Reflections and strategies from students, supervisors and administrators.